Posts Tagged ‘Historic Waimakariri’

The Belgians Have Not Forgotten – Passchendaele Exhibit in the Council Chambers, Rangiora

11 September 2017

 

The Belgians Have Not Forgotten, an exhibition that reminds us of the huge sacrifices that our country made in the Battle of Passchendaele in October 1917 is on display in the Council Chamber in Rangiora.  We have been fortunate to get it near the end of a tour of Australia and New Zealand, between its Christchurch and Dunedin appointments.

This, of course, is the battle’s centenary year.  The Passchendaele battlefield is within the Municipality of Zonnebeke, which has a twinning relationship with Waimakariri.

All are welcome.  It is open during office hours.

Work Proceeds on the Junction (Robbies) Facade

9 August 2014

140806 Shotcrete on back of facade, Junction Hotel 1

Much of the façade has now been shotcreted on the back. The concrete you can see has a lot of steel in it.  Once some temporary bracing has been put in place, the rest of the building can be demolished. The bracing will be removed when a new building is constructed by new owners.

Keeping a Record of Our Changing District

2 March 2013

The Rangiora Museum is doing a project on the shops on High Street. They would like to see any photos or information anyone may have of shops that are or were on High Street. The contacts are Pam Mackintosh (313 9343), Ann Jelfs (313 7592) or Leith Newell (313 8505).

IMG_0032 (200x133)

The area cleared by CERA in Courtenay Drive, Kaiapoi – before the earthquakes a residential area.

Keeping a photographic record for the future is well worth doing. The central parts of our towns are probably getting well photographed as they change, but I wonder about the residential areas in Kaiapoi, The Pines and Kairaki. The changes are occurring progressively – the scene on the left is as it is now, but was the process of getting to this state photographed?

To give some idea of the scale of the change, Kaiapoi has lost or will lose somewhere between 30 and 40 commercial or community spaces in the town centre since the September quake.

Hunnibell’s (now Capone’s) is a Waimakariri “Landmark”.

1 January 2013

121218 Capone's, Rangiora (640x480)

 

Capone’s Restaurant, which started life as Hunnibell’s Boot Shop in the early 1870s, is a well-known building in Rangiora – in fact it is the oldest commercial building in the High Street.

At various times (after a long time as a boot shop), it has been an accountant’s office, a beauty salon and a bike shop – and the rooms upstairs, where the Hunnibells once lived, were let as a flat for a time.

Apart from the brick chimney which goes up the middle, the building appears to have survived the earthquakes well.

The Landmarks programme recognises heritage buildings in the town centres of Rangiora and Kaiapoi. Buildings that are being considered have to be well maintained and research is done into their history before they are approved. As much information as possible is put on to the plaque, but further information is also put on the Council website at http://landmarks.waimakariri.govt.nz/home.aspx .

121203 Hunnibell's (Capone's) Landmarks Plaque 2 (640x480)

Pegasus Three Years Ago

19 October 2012

Pegasus in September 2009. It is easy to forget how much it has grown.

Passchendaele Remembered

12 October 2012

New Zealand and Belgian flags fly at half-mast in Rangiora in memory of those who died at the Battle of Passchendaele in 1917.

From: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/new-zealanders-in-belgium/passchendaele

Troops from 2nd Brigade and 3rd (Rifle) Brigade advanced at 5.25 a.m. in drizzle that soon turned to driving rain. As they struggled towards the ridge in front of them, they found their way blocked by the uncut barbed wire. Exposed to raking German machine-gun fire from both the front and flank, the New Zealanders were pinned down in shell craters in front of the wire. A few determined individuals tried to get through the barrier, but they were quickly killed.

Orders came for another push at 3 p.m., but this was mercifully postponed and then cancelled. The troops eventually fell back to positions close to their start line. For badly wounded soldiers lying in the mud, the aftermath of the battle was a private hell; many died before they could be rescued.

The toll was horrendous. There were more than 2700 New Zealand casualties, of which 45 officers and 800 men were either dead or lying mortally wounded between the lines. In terms of lives lost in a single day, this remains the blackest day in New Zealand’s post-1840 existence.

Rangiora Bowling Club Pavilion Recognised as Landmark

15 April 2012

The Rangiora Bowling Club Pavilion has been recognised as a “Landmark”. At a short reception last Thursday, Annette Golding, a grand-daughter of one of the original builders, unveiled the plaque.  This follows the refurbishment of the building by the Club to turn the lower storey into a more usable lounge for members.  The work included earthquake-strengthening to bring the 100-year-old building up to code.  The pavilion is a Category II historic place

I can think of few buildings in Rangiora that are more worthy of the the term “landmark” than this one.  It occupies a prominent place on the corner of Blackett and Good Streets, which would be one of the town’s busier intersections.

The Landmarks project has been ongoing over a number of years, starting as an inititaive of Our Town Rangiora, the Rangiora and Districts Early Records Society and the Council. The aim is to recognise the work of owners to preserve their heritage buildings in the centre of the town  and to inform people of the history of those buildings. The programme has been more recently extended to Kaiapoi. Other recent plaques have gone on the Kaiapoi Band Rotunda and the the former Parrott’s grocery store in Rangiora (now Rangiora Eyecare).

We have lost a number of heritage buildings in the District because of the earthquakes and others have been closed to the public because they have been assessed as dangerous.  It is great, therefore, to have a good-news story!

You can read more at http://landmarks.waimakariri.govt.nz/home.aspx

 

 

Corners of Waimakariri: the Horrellville Church

25 March 2012

The older building dates from the 19th Century and is a Category 2 Historic Place.  It is the orginal church, replaced by the 1950s building seen on the left – a scaled-down version of Trinity Methodist Church in Rangiora. The Horrellville church is now part of the Oxford District Union Parish.

Canterbury has lost so much heritage, it is good to see some surviving.

Corners of Waimakariri: St Matthew’s Anglican Church, Fernside

1 January 2011

Since 1874, St Matthew’s has been a centre for the Fernside community.  It is one of several in the District designed by the notable colonial Church architect, Benjamin Mountfort.  Bishop Harper laid the foundation stone and within 6 months the church had been built and was debt-free, because he was able to return and consecrate it.

The church can be found on the corner of Mount Thomas and Mairaki Roads.

A Grand Old Lady Gets a Landmarks Plaque

27 May 2010

The Rangiora Town Hall received a “Landmarks” Plaque today – 84 years to the day after it was opened.  Somewhat controversial at the time (what’s new?) it now generates a lot of enthusiasm amongst many locals. It is one of the very few theatres of its type left in New Zealand.

The plaque was unveiled by Malcolm McIntosh (left), great nephew of the mayor of the time, Robert McIntosh (his wife Robina performed the actual opening in 1926). Robert was one of the two McIntosh brothers who were mayors of Rangiora and Kaiapoi at the same time.

As you can see, the plaque has yet to be fixed.  The wet weather has meant that the necessary adhesives might not work!

The unveiling featured songs from the 1920s sung by the North Canterbury Musical Society Singers (conducted by Gail Fox), speeches from Dave Sanderson of the Musical Society and from the current and former movie theatre operators, Patrick Walsh and Fred Read.  Yours truly added a few historical details.

Outside, there were a couple of Model A Fords supplied by Peter Bayler and Alan Hill. 

The grand old lady holds lots of stories and some were relayed by people present today.  It was a good way to celebrate one of the District’s notable buildings.

Another Kaiapoi Landmark Commemorated

15 May 2010

The former BNZ building in Kaiapoi – now housing John Rhind Funeral Directors – was given a “Landmarks” plaque this morning.  Now owned by the M E Ayres Trust, the restored building is a credit to Pat Peoples and her son Paul Ayres.

The BNZ is the second building on the site and reflects the way 19th Century banks liked to present themselves to the public: solid and safe.

The Landmarks programmes in Kaiapoi and Rangiora are slowly but surely commemorating with plaques the notable historic buildings of the towns.  It is my strong belief that increasing communities’ knowledge of the their histories helps make those communities stronger. 

Kaiapoi has a notable built heritage and around the Charles Street – Williams Street corner provides a very good example.  The former BNZ is a very important part of that precinct.

Corners of Waimakariri: the Kaiapoi Woollen Mill

16 March 2010

Kaiapoi played an important part in the early settler economy of North Canterbury.  The region’s agricultural products moved there to the port, the freezing works or the woollen mill.

The Kaiapoi Woollen Mill and the “Kaiapoi” brand were famous and probably many homes still have Kaiapoi rugs to be brought out on cold days.

Today the mill still has an important function, housing a variety of businesses and is a sprawling, low-rise presence on the Cam River.

Corners of Waimakariri: Rangiora’s First Post Office

1 February 2010

Although it has had a bit added on to it and has been shifted from its original High Street site, this house in King Street is Rangiora’s “first” Post Office.

It was originally on High Street close to the current site.  Prior to that, postal facilities had been provided in Wilson’s store by the railway line, followed by Blackett’s store, more central on the north side of the street.

It wasn’t, therefore the first post office, but it was the first building dedicated to that purpose.

Change comes to Southbrook: St Mary’s Anglican Church

22 January 2010

A landmark in Southbrook Road since the early days (the foundation stone says 1879, but I’m not sure if that was for the current building), St Mary’s was an adjunct to St John the Baptist Church in Rangiora.

The site is now subject to a resource consent application from the business that operates Rangiora Mazda, on the other side of the road.  They are being forced to relocate because their current site is part of where Foodstuffs have applied for planning permission for a new Pak n’ Save supermarket. 

The application for the St Mary’s site says that the church will be incorporated into the design of the site that will need to be developed.

Quite clearly, and assuming consent is given,  the site will look very different.

This is a further example of how Southbrook is growing into an ever-more-important business node for the District.

Waimakariri – there’s a lot happening! – November 2009

29 December 2009

Another month of happenings in Waimakariri.  

Ohoka School Fair - run in conjunction with the famous Garden Tour.

   

  

Rangiora Early Records Society visits Stratford Grove on the Rangiora-Woodend Road, one of the many grand old homes in our District.

Rangiora Early Records Society visits Stratford Grove on the Rangiora-Woodend Road, one of the many grand old homes in our District.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

  

 
 
 

Southbrook School Fair


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