Archive for the ‘North of the Ashley’ Category

Sefton Tug of War is Back!

21 April 2017

Waimakariri Experiences an Outbreak of Democracy

12 August 2016

Well, nominations have closed and we have elections for all positions except the Ohoka-Swannanoa subdivision of the Oxford-Ohoka Community Board  where there are three nominations for three positions.

It’s great to see a large number of people putting themselves forward to serve our community. 

Check the Council website for the names. 

Sefton Tug o War the Event of the Day!

22 May 2016

image

The annual Sefton Tug o War is on again! A bit slippery underfoot but the cool day is probably helping the many teams from #Waimakariri and beyond! A fund raiser for the Sefton School.

The New Ashley Bridge is Open!

21 February 2015

image

The new bridge over the Ashley-Rakahuri north of #Rangiora is now officially open, although traffic won’t be on it until later next week. An important new connection for #Waimakariri.

Ashley Bridge Opening on Saturday!

18 February 2015

All are welcome to the opening of the bridge on Saturday morning.  The event starts at 11.00am.

Find out more at http://waimakariri.govt.nz/services/roads_transport/ashley-bridge-opening-ceremony.aspx

The new bridge and current bridge side by side.

Ford Rally Tours Waimakariri

30 September 2013

_MG_1416 (300x200)

If you were in Kaiapoi, Tuahiwi, Loburn, White Rock or Rangiora yesterday, and saw a huge variety of vehicles of varying going past and wondered what was going on, a closer look would have told you they were Fords. Fords come from a variety of places, of course: USA, Britain, Australia, even Japan.

Yours truely was therein our 1968 Corsair, but the variet was huge, from a Model ‘T’ and a number of Model ‘A’s, to Cortinas, Mustangs and Thunderbirds. The car pictured is a 1955 Ford Popular.

The annual Henry Ford Rally always starts in New Brighton and often finishes north of the Waimakariri. For many years it has been run by Trevor and Lorraine Stanley, recently of Christchurch but now of Amberley. At right is a 1955 Ford Popular at the finishing point, Rossburn, near Rangiora.

Rangiora Town Hall Contract Let – and Other Major Projects Getting Under Way

10 September 2013

100102 Rangiora Town Hall001A

The contract for the strengthening and expansion of the Rangiora Town Hall has been let to Naylor Love. There is no specific start date, but expect it to be soon.  Site clearance has been carried out in preparation.

The tender was below budget, as was that of the new Kaiapoi Library, Museum and Service Centre.

The additions to the hall will assist in the strengthening of the existing part.

Other major projects are making good progress:

  • Work has started on the Kaiapoi library, service centre and museum.  This is the biggest of the post-earthquake projects.
  • Underground replacements and street works around the Kaiapoi bridge are progressing well.
  • The Oxford Town Hall strengthening and the rebuild of the A&P “hall” (part of the Town Hall) will go out to tender soon.
  • Design work is progressing well on the Cones Road Ashley Bridge (the only job here that is not earthquake related).
  • A Kaiapoi Community Board / Council working party has started work on the Kaiapoi riverbanks, including the wharf area.
  • Demolition of the Kaiapoi War Memorial building has commenced.  This will enable work to start on what will be the town’s central playground next to Trousselot Park.

New Houses Still Coming Thick and Fast in Waimakariri

4 July 2013

WAIMAKARIRI DISTRICT: BUILDING CONSENTS FOR NEW DWELLINGS 2013

 

 

Month

Year

Kaiapoi

Rangiora

Oxford

Woodend

Small

Town/

Beach

Residential   4 (Rural

Residential)

Pegasus

Res 6

Rural

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2013

30

15

6

1

3

12

28

10

105

February 2013

36

26

5

1

1

16

17

17

119

March 2013

27

71

2

0

1

6

18

19

144

April 2013

15

22

2

0

4

8

13

15

79

May 2013

29

31

3

0

1

15

15

13

107

June 2013

20

26

6

0

3

4

8

10

77

157

191

24

2

13

61

99

84

631

 

 

77 consents for new dwellings were issued in June 2013, which is 7 more than for June 2012.  For the year to date 631 consents for new dwellings have been issued compared with 495 for the first 6 months of 2012.

 

In June 9 consents were issued for new dwellings in the Silverstream subdivision as compared with 11 elsewhere in Kaiapoi, principally in the Sovereign Palms subdivisions.

 

The distribution for consents for new dwellings for the Rural Zone for 2013 is:

19       UDS area east of Two Chain Road and South of the Ashley River/Rakahuri

47       West of District

18       North of the Ashley River/Rakahuri

Ashley Bridge Fully Open

1 July 2013

The Ashley Bridge north of Rangiora is now open to all vehicles and with the normal speed limit of 80km/h.

Until the new bridge is built, the old one will have to be nursed. It is likely that it it will have to be closed more often, i.e. the river will not be as high as in the past before it has to be closed.

Hopefully this won’t happen too often, if at all. We have good reason to believe the new bridge will be open by the end of next year, 2014.

Ashley Bridge at Rangiora Re-Opened for Light Traffic

29 June 2013

130628 Ashley Bridge Under Repair 4 (500x333)The Ashley Bridge at Cones Road between Rangiora and Ashley has been reopened to traffic today. In the meantime, it is restricted to light vehicles (i.e. under 2 tonnes) and there is a temporary 30km/h speed limit in place.

We all need to pay tribute to Taggarts for their work in the riverbed and Daniel Smith contractors for the construction of a support to replace the missing pier – and for the speed in which they did it.

Public Meetings to be Held on Ashley Bridge

27 June 2013

Actually, not on the bridge. About it!

We were planning these before the NZTA decision on funding, but they will give an opportunity for people to find out more and to ask questions.

WDC08494_Cones Rd Bridge Ad

 

NZTA Approves Funding for New Ashley Bridge at Rangiora

26 June 2013

The heading says it all.

This afternoon the Council was informed that the NZ Transport Agency had approved funding for a new bridge over the Ashley.

It will now be full speed ahead completing the design work and getting a contractor to build it. Once actual work starts, the estimate is that it will take about 12 months to build.

Work will continue repairing the current bridge, of course

.Ashley Cart Bridge Opening 1902 (1)

A Letter About the Ashley Bridge and My Reply

22 June 2013

Dear David,

After the disaster of the first day when the bridge closed, traffic levels have eased off somewhat, meaning that my trip to school does not take so long. This has been helped by (a) presence of Mr. Plod and (b) people now knowing distances and times to get to work (c) lots choosing not to go to work today!
 
However, my concerns about the Cones Road bridge have not abated. Council has known for years that the bridge was at the end of its life span. I find it hard to believe that they sat around waiting for government subsidies to kick in!
 
Around 1990/91 it appears that the ‘state highway’ appellation was removed and re-designated ‘scenic highway.’ Did that affect subsidies? Is this why nothing happened for so long?
 
I have written to my local MP about this issue. I know that nothing will happen (National MP) but it made me feel better. Is there anything that we can do as a group on the north side of the Ashley river to keep this issue in the public eye? Or is the council pressuring the Transit Authority anyway?
 
Realistically speaking I am less inconvenienced than some of my fellow rural residents, but some of my colleagues are facing long commutes to work; this is in addition to their farming duties. Very stressful for them at this time of the year.
 
You say that the bridge qualifies for a 60% subsidy; when, realistically, could that money be apportioned? What is wrong with having a Bailey’s bridge until that bridge is built? Why spend more money on the present bridge? At what point does it become uneconomic to repair? I have lots more questions. I had better stop. Will there be any public meetings to clarify things with ratepayers?
 
Regards,
…………
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
 Hi ……..Thanks for your email.

Yes, you are probably right about the traffic. I sat in my car at the Wyllies Road / Main North Road corner yesterday morning (Friday) to monitor the traffic. I arrived about 3 minutes to 7.00 and left just after 8.30. For almost all of that time the queue varied between 0 and 4, but there were 2 or 3 periods of heavier traffic. The longest queues occurred for 5-10 minutes around 8.15 when they got up to 20-25 vehicles at times. I timed one obvious vehicle as it joined the queue in the distance and it took almost exactly 2 minutes for it to get on to the Main North Road. The other busier periods saw the queue get up to about 12, and these cleared quickly – seconds rather than minutes. The police weren’t there.

However, it was probably not all that typical a day and I agree that quite a few would have stayed home if they were able to. This meant that there were almost certainly fewer coming from Sefton as well as more gaps on the Main North Road.

The Council in my time, which relative to the bridge is since 1986 (the Borough Council was not involved with it) has sought engineering reports on the structure from time to time. The answer that always came back was at least 10 years. This did not mean that in the engineers’ view that it had only had 10 years left or that they they kept changing their minds, its just that the engineers were merely projecting as far as they were prepared to go. It was another way of saying that they found nothing structurally unsound. “Useful life” is a strange concept – the useful life of a house is assessed at 50 years, but we all know there are hundreds of thousands of them older than that and going well.

Probably the main issue that the community and the Council was concerned about was the narrowness and the consequent lack of safety, particularly for cyclists. It was also well known that some pedestrians were walking across the railway bridge and that trucks sometimes stopped to let an oncoming truck through.

The Council received a lot of requests for a pedestrian/cycle clip-on and application had been put in to NZTA for subsidy. It was on their list, but hadn’t got far enough up it. In the event it became unlikely because the new National-led overnment changed its priorities away from pedestrian and cycle facilities and towards roads, particularly major motorway projects, mostly in the North Island. This has also meant that the clip-on on the old Waimakariri bridge, which is supported by both us and Christchurch (it’s on our boundary) is going nowhere. It is also on the regional NZTA list of priorities but is unlikely to gain subsidy unless there is a change of government priorities.

An important change came in 2010 when it was discovered that the river was scouring under one of the piers. The bridge had to be jacked up and the temporary steel support put in place. The other piers were also checked, of course, and it was confirmed that other piers were in place but vulnerable. Note that this is not a problem with the structure per se – it’s with the riverbed and the depth of the piers. Old photos show that the riverbed was much higher when the bridge was built.

None of this was known before 2010. The steps that were taken then were to raise the bridge in NZTA’s priorities. The periodic closures of the bridge in high water helped the case, as did the likelihood that piers would have to be progressively replaced with steel structures. It also helps the case that the detour is long.

I want to emphasise that none of the problem with the depth of the piers and the scouring was known before 2010.

My assumption of what happened on Monday is that the pier was scoured out, and with nothing under it, it simply dropped out. Photos of the bridge under construction show that the steel reinforcing in the top of the piers was designed to hold the deck laterally on to the pier, i.e. to stop it moving sideways. The reinforcing rods are verticle and would not prevent the pier from dropping.

The NZTA programme is a three-year one and we are just entering its second year. The design work that has been approved is under way. We were hacked off that the entire job was not in the programme, but there was a remote hope that the once the design work was done NZTA would have the information they needed and that our project might replace an approved project that wasn’t going to get done.

Once the scouring issue revealed itself, the cycle clip-on project was dropped. We needed a new bridge – now.

So:

  • The problem that is going to get the bridge replaced revealed itself only in 2010.
  • The NZTA programme works in three-year cycles and the latest programme was not approved until 2012 (obviously the previous one was 2009).
  • NZTA say they need more information – the design work, which they are subsidising, will provide that.
  • NZTA’s programmes are heavily driven by government priorities.
  • We are still not guaranteed NZTA subsidy, but it will go the Board in July.

The bridge is the only major project that we have on our books that is not earthquake-related. The Kaiapoi infrastructure rebuild comes mainly out of insurance and government grants. The Kaiapoi Aquatic Centre is largely funded by insurance and grants. We have a grant that will cover about 50% of the Kaiapoi riverbank / wharf etc (a $4m job in total), the rest is from rates. The Kaiapoi Library and Museum, an $11m job, has a an element of insurance in it, but is mostly funded by ratepayers. The Rangiora Town Hall (partly earthquake-related) is totally rates funded, as are Kaiapoi and Rangiora town centres restoration. The latter are not, strictly speaking, earthquake jobs, but are being brought forward to help revitalise the town centres (Kaiapoi has an earthquake element). The Oxford Town Hall will be part strengthening and part rebuild and will cost $2m, all out of rates. Note that we can collect insurance for earthquake damage but not where a building is earthquake-prone.

So, despite the earthquake, we have kept the bridge as a top priority and budgeted for its replacement. However, we really need the $6m or so from the government. I think it is something of an achievement to be able to keep average rates (I stress average) to 5.1% max for the first 3 years and under 4% for the remaining 7 years of the current 10-year plan, given what we are facing. Those percentages include an allowance of about 3% for inflation.

A small point: Cones Road was never State Highway. The original State Highway 72 went from Woodend to Winchester. After it lost its SH status, it was labelled “Route 72” and “Inland Scenic Route”, but this is unofficial and apart from other SHs around Mt Hutt and Geraldine became all local road for the various councils. At some later point it was decided to run the Inland Scenic Route from Rangiora to Amberley, rather than to Woodend – possibly to connect it to Hurunui’s and Kaikoura’s Alpine Pacific Triangle.

You ask how you can help. The voice of the community coming direct from the community can always help. Obviously there are the politicians (the local ones have got the message loud and clear!) such as local MPs on both sides of the river – I get the impression some residents north of the river do not realise they are in the Kaikoura electorate. The Minister of Transport is Gerry Brownlee. The Labour spokesperson is Phil Twiford. I’m not sure about the other parties’ spokespersons. Richard Prosser MP (NZ First) lives in Marshmans Road.

Our next step with NZTA is their July Board meeting. Further information from the design work currently being done, plus the current situation, will be put before that meeting. I don’t know how we will get on, but I would presume they have some emergency funds available. $6m (if that is what it is) is not huge in the national scheme of things, but it means a lot to ratepayers.

With regard to the present bridge, we will have to keep it open until a new one is finished. We could do quite a few repairs like that done in 2010 for way less than the cost of a new bridge, but we wouldn’t want to go there, because, as we all know, the bridge is totally inadequate for modern requirements. The 2010 repair was effected without closing the bridge so I suppose that could happen again over the current months if we encountered more problems. The estimated actual build-time of the new bridge, after preliminary and detailed design work, calling and awarding tenders, etc. is about one year.

Yes, we are considering holding a public meeting or meetings.

I hope this all gives you some background – and thanks for writing to Colin King!

Regards

David

 

The Ashley Bridge at Cones Road, Rangiora – Where to From Here?

20 June 2013

Council Management are in touch with NZTA, who should be considering the bridge next month.

080731-rakahuri-in-flood002

The Ashley in flood, 2008 – taken from the Cones Rd Bridge

In the meantime, design work is continuing and information from that process can be fed into NZTA. They will want to have as clear an idea of costings as possible – and that is dependent on the design adopted. Costs can be influenced by such factors as whether any land needs to be purchased for the approaches and whether the new bridge is built upstream or downstream. The design work, of course, includes the approaches as well as the bridge itself.

The Council has budgeted it’s share – it is in the 2012 Long Term (10 Year) Plan, and re-confirmed in the 2013 Annual Plan finally approved two days ago. It is based on the assumption that design work would be finished this coming financial year (July 2013-June 2014) and that if the bridge was given approval by NZTA that work could start in 2014-15. If NZTA approved earlier funding, the Council is able bring its budget forward.

Big projects like this are funded by loan so that future residents get to help pay for them. This loan has been included in our future debt projections.

images


The current bridge over the Ashley being constructed. The first bridge is on the left.

The current bridge will have to be maintained until a new one is built, and this could mean closures when the water reaches critical depths.

The next few weeks will see work being done to put in temporary support in place of the missing pier.  This will, of course, go much deeper than the current piers.

When this work can start properly depends on the river dropping to a point where it can be diverted to allow machinery into the riverbed to do the diversion and to make the repair.  Diversion will also allow a closer look to be undertaken at the remaining piers to see what has happened to them over the last few days.

Ashley Bridge Update

19 June 2013
Council News Media Release Today:
Following the flood damage to the Ashley Bridge at Cones Road in Rangiora yesterday in which one its piers was swept away, Waimakariri District Council contractors, Taggart Earthmoving Ltd, are today deploying a bulldozer to the river in an attempt to divert the flow of water so as to allow engineering assessments of the extent of any further damage. Immediately following that, Daniel Smith Ltd will be undertaking repair work on the pier that was washed away in an attempt to return the bridge to useable service as soon as possible.
 
The operation will be subject to weather conditions and river flows. The bridge itself will be closed at least until next week and, dependent on the outcome of the assessments being carried out, more likely for a significantly longer period. How long, at this stage, is unknown.
 
Traffic diversions are in place and the Council has sought the assistance of both the Police and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) in handling the likely volume of traffic diverted onto State Highway 1.

… More on the Ashley Bridge north of Rangiora – a pier has gone.

19 June 2013

Sometime in the middle of yesterday morning, a pier was washed out from the Cones Road Bridge just to the north of Rangiora. Amazingly, the spans held up by the pier have remained in place.

This is tremendously inconvenient and costly to residents on both sides of the river, as the detour via the State Highway 1 bridge is a long one. It is also very difficult to get on to the State Highway at Wyllies Road – and the Toppings Rd-Wyllies Rd route through Sefton is also prone to icing and surface flooding.

This means that the bridge will remain closed until a temporary fix can be put in place. How long it takes to complete this work (a contractor has already been engaged) will depend on water levels dropping and on whether the two adjacent piers are OK. If it snows later this week, the subsequent melt won’t help with water levels.

It must be emphasised that the problem is with the river scouring under the piers, a problem that was identified about three years ago. At that time a temporary arrangement was put in place to replace a pier that had been scoured out. That temporary job, and  the one weare about to do, have to be done because bridges like this take years to design and build, not months.

The bridge has been closed on occasions since (including on Monday) because of the likelihood of what has happened would happen.

Since then, the Council has been trying very hard to get subsidy from NZTA – see yesterday’s post ….!  Hopefully, today’s event will help concentrate some minds in Wellington.

March is Fair Month in Waimakariri!

27 March 2013

The Oxford A&P Show comes at the end of the month, but March is fair month in our District.

130310 Sefton Gala & Sports 1 (300x225)

Sefton Gala and Sports

130310 Sefton Gala & Sports 2 (300x225)

Sefton Gala and Sports – a good old-fashioned sack race!

130317 Kaiapoi Toy Library Community Fun Day (300x200)

Kaiapoi Toy Library’s Community Fun Day

Lots Happening in Waimakariri – a Community in Good Heart!

17 December 2012
121031 Kaiapoi Light Party 3 (300x225)

Kaiapoi Light Party

121026 Tree Planting at RHS (300x225)

Tree Planting at Rangiora High

121027 Plunket Stalls in Victoria Park (300x225)

Plunket Stalls in Rangiora

121028 Morris Dancers at Ashley School Fete 1 (300x225)

Morris Dancers at Ashley School Fete

121028 Sovereign Palms Family Fun Day (300x225)

Sovereign Palms Family Fun Day, Kaiapoi

121030 Historic Rangiora pictures 1 (300x200)

Murals on Rangiora “Pop-Up” Shops

121101 Kaiapoi HS Opening of Library Space 1 (300x225)

Opening of Kaiapoi High’s Library Space

121030 W-A Lifeboat 3 (300x200)

Driving Waimakariri-Ashley Lifeboat, near Kairaki

121101 Kaiapoi HS Road Crash (300x225) (300x225)

Road Crash Day at Kaiapoi High

121102 Kaiapoi Garden Club 90th 2 (300x225)

Kaiapoi Garden Club’s 90th Birthday

121102 WACT Exhibition in Chamber 1 (300x225)

Waimakariri Art Collection Trust Exhibition in Rangiora

121103 Oxford Fete 4 (300x225)

Oxford Garden Fete

121111 West Eyreton Garden Tour 2 (300x225)

West Eyreton School Garden Tour

121201 Maahunui II Opening, Tuahiwi Marae - Copy (216x300)

Opening of Maahunui II at Tuahiwi

121209 Oxford Gym Opening 1 (300x225)

Oening of Oxford Health & Fitness Centre

121209 Rangiora Christmas Parade 13 (300x225)

Rangiora Christms Parade

121216 Oxford Christmas Parade 1 (300x225)

Oxford Christmas Parade

 

The Ashley Bridge Looks Interesting from Underneath!

25 October 2012

This photo of the Cones Road Bridge over the Ashley near Rangiora, with a fair bit of water going under it a couple of weeks ago (no, it wasn’t closed!) shows the fix-it job done when it was found that the river was scouring out under the piles. The little bit of weed you can see beside the bridge is caught on one of the piles left from the pre-1910 “cart” bridge.

The Ashley Bridge (Cones Road, Rangiora): the Good News and the Maybe Bad News

2 October 2012

 

The Ashley Bridge is 100 years old this year: it was opened by the Governor on the same day as he visited the Rangiora Show.

The photo above shows it under construction, but now, as most of us believe, it has passed its use-by date.  It is too narrow and there is scouring occurring under the piles.

The Waimakariri Council has budgeted for its replacement over the next 2-3 years, with the first year being for design work.  But doing it depends on obtaining NZ Transport Agency (i.e. Government) subsidy, which would be 60% of the cost.

NZTA has approved subsidy for the design work.  That’s the Good News, so that will go ahead over the coming year.

They haven’t, however, promised to fund the building of the bridge.  That will depend on the cost that emerges from the design work, the availability of money and government priorities. St that’s Not Particularly Good News.  We, the community, had wanted greater surety than that.  It’s not a “no”, but it’s not a “yes” either.

But at least we are going to get a start.

Text Alerts on Bridge Closures – Ashley and Old Waimakariri

20 August 2012

If you would like to be on the list to receive text alerts about bridge closures and re-openings, email your name and cellphone number to office@wmk.govt.nz. Please put ‘Bridge Closure Text Alerts’ as the subject of your email.

Note: The text alerts are for both the Ashley and Old Waimakariri Bridges. There isn’t an option to just receive alerts for just one of the bridges.

Sefton Tug of War is Coming, Sunday 20 May

7 February 2012

Check out their website.  http://www.tugofwar.sefton.org.nz/

This is a great event, raising funds for the Sefton School. Be warned: it might be fun, but its VERY competitive!

Ashley Bridge Proposed for Council Programme

31 January 2012

A new Ashley Bridge at Cones Road, Rangiora, is in the Draft Long Term (10 Year) Plan as a proposal to go to the Canterbury Regional Transport Committee and the NZ Transport Agency for inclusion in their programme for the next three years. 

Approval at that level is necessary for the project to gain Government subsidy. If the bridge includes a separate pedestrian lane, the total cost is likely to be in the area of $10.2m, with a bit over $4m being the Waimakariri District’s share.

If we don’t put an application in this year, we will have to wait another three years.  The bridge has a good chance of making the cut, the main question being its width.

A Triple Whammy – or is it a Quadruple?

25 January 2012

When it comes to big community facilities projects, we normally do one at a time – as happened with the Dudley Pool.

This time, the earthquake and the justified heightened sensitivity to earthquake-prone buildings, has left us with three big ones all at once:

  • The Kaiapoi Library/Museum
  • The Rangiora Town Hall
  • The Oxford Town Hall

These are amongst the problems facing the Council for its Long Term (10 Year) Plan.

But wait there’s more …

                … a new bridge over the Ashley north of Rangiora.

Update on Bridges

8 January 2012

I’m often asked about some of our bridges.

Williams Street Bridge, Kaiapoi

This came out of the earthquakes quite well – it’s the approach on the nothern side that is now rubbish, and getting worse. As for the bridge itself, the Kaiapoi Town Centre Plan proposes that parking be removed and the footpaths made wider to allow people to linger and look up and down the river.  There will be seating on it as well.

Ashley River Bridge at Cones Road, Rangiora

The Council is endeavouring to get a replacement put on to the Canterbury Regional Transport Plan and the chances are very good.  It is intended that this will be wide enough for cyclists and pedestrians to cross it in safety.   The total cost is likely to be in the area of $10m, but it will attract a 60% subsidy from the NZ Transport Agency if the project it approved.

Old Waimakariri Cycle & Pedestrian Clipons

Not much joy here, I’m afraid. The bridge is jointly owned by Waimakariri and Christchurch and neither Council is very keen on doing the work without NZTA subsidy.  To get this will require a change in Government policy direction towards pedestrian and cycle facilities.

Waimakariri Gorge Bridge

This bridge, jointly owned by Waimakariri and Selwyn, is to get a new deck very soon.  Both councils have budgeted for it.  The common claim that the two councils have been arguing over it is urban myth.

The Waimakariri Gorge Bridge with a train about to cross it, ca.1921

Nearly Three Months On …

1 January 2011

I said I would keep this blog going.  This might have been a foolish promise, but my New Year’s resolution is … you’ve guessed it.

Obviously life has been busy, but since Christmas we have been able to get a bit of a breather.  Earthquake recovery has, of course dominated, and I’ll report on that in another post.  But also what has happened in the last three months has brought home the richness of community life in the Waimakariri District.

Richard and Dawn Spark and Phil and Jo Seal (Gulliver & Tyler Funeral Directors) have built a chapel at Rossburn Receptions that was opened in October by Hon Kate Wilkinson MP.

As well as funerals, the chapel will be used for weddings etc – in conjunction with the reception business the Sparks run.

On the same day, a concert was held to say to the people of Kaiapoi – hey! we’ve been hit by an earthquake but we can still have a good time.

One of the main organisers was Ben Brennan, newly-elected to the Kaiapoi Community Board.

Yes, a chain comes with the job!

The Rangiora A&P Show is always a highlight of the year and numbers weren’t too badly suppressed by the Earthquake Concert in Christchurch at the same time – although teenagers were noticeably absent in Rangiora.

The Kaiapoi Light Party, an annual event put on by local churches, drew a large crowd – especially of kids who were able to try everything out for free.

The Chamber Gallery in Rangiora staged an exhibition by Veronique Moginot who, although she is of French background, put on a show that had a strong Eastern Orthodox flavour.

This proved an ideal setting for Musica Balkanica who performed their Balkan repertoir in the Chamber Gallery in November.

Kaiapoi was the starting point for a group of peeny-farthings which headed for Oamaru via Oxford.  I presume they made it!

Both Kaiapoi and Rangiora High Schools had Road Crash days put on by the Police and Waimakariri Road Safety, with the help of many others, including the Kaiapoi and Rangiora Volunteer Fire Brigades, St Johns Ambulance and Gulliver and Tyler.

The Kaiapoi Christmas Parade seemed to be bigger than ever and drew large crowds – as did the preceding market in Williams Street. A sunny day with everyone in good spirits!

Congratulations to the Kaiapoi Promotion Association.

I’ve been to North Loburn School twice, for an Enviroschools day and for the inauguration  of active warning signs.  They get a lot of trucks going past the school from the Mount Grey forest and from the Whiterock quarry – and while the trucking companies and drivers are working well with the school, safety is always a concern. Pictured is the principal, Simon Green.

Cust is seeing if a market can work for their community – those in places like Oxford, Ohoka, Woodend and Kaiapoi are going well.

Like Kaiapoi, the Rangiora Christmas Parade had a great day.  Here is the crowd in Victoria Park afterwards.

Our Town Rangiora did well.

Oxford, on the other hand, struck a wet day for their Christmas Parade.  Here the the Union Parish take shelter waiting for it to start – fortunately the rain did stop for the parade itself and all went well.

The Oxford Lions again put on a good community day for Oxford.

It was good to have a temporary library open in Kaiapoi – and the Aquatic Centre too.

The launch of the book Our Soldiers at the Rangiora RSA helped further the growing ties between the Waimakariri District and Passchendaele in Belgium.

I’m with the the author Paul O’Connor, Belgian Consul Lieve Bierque and Bill Whitehead, President of the Rangiora RSA. (Photo from the Northern Outlook).

Josh Smith of Kaiapoi received a Young Totara leadership award from the Rotary Club of Rangiora for the leadership and responsibility he showed working in the welfare centre in Kaiapoi after the earthquake.

The Ashley Bridge: My Position

19 September 2010

Costings have not been fully done, but early indications are that a new bridge serving Ashley, Loburn and Sefton would cost $8m-$11m.  If we were to continue repairing the old bridge it would cost about $2m over 20 years, still have to close it for up to 20 days a year and then need to build a new one.

To me it is a no-brainer.  We all know that the bridge is too narrow and has other deficiencies. The only thing standing in the way of building a new one would be the failure of the NZ Transport Agency to fund its share.

The First Pier Fixed Under the Ashley Bridge

15 September 2010

With everything else, it is easy to forget that work continued on this!  For the record, the earthquake did not do any damage to the bridge.

This is just to fix the immediate problem. We still have to work toward a new bridge – and soon.

Ashley Community Group Looking for Secretary and Treasurer

27 August 2010
The Ashley Community Church in Canterbury Street

The Ashley Community Church is looking for a secretary/treasurer – or perhaps two people to carry out each role.

Despite appearances, this isn’t actually a church group.  We are a small group (I’m a member of it) dedicated to maintaining and restoring this Category II Historic Place.  It is actually in quite good condition, but there is always work to be done.
The church dates from the 1870s and was designed by the notable colonial church architect, Benjamin Mountford – which is part of its significance. 
It was formerly an Anglican church but is now owned by the society.  A small Orthodox congregation currently uses it.
If you think you can help, please contact me.  As secretarial and treasurership jobs go, it isn’t a big one.

The Ashley Bridge – What’s Happening – and what of the Future?

6 August 2010

The current situation is that when the Ashley is in flood the bridge is at a high risk from a public safety perspective – 5 to 7 of the peirs may need to be strengthened in the short term.  The piles are embedded only 2-3m on average and only 1-2m in the main channel.

Compare these two photos:

The Cones Road bridge over the Ashley - unknown date. (Te Papa)

Note the difference in the bed levels.  Note also that some repair work appears to have been done on the nearest pier in the recent photo.  The pier causing the biggest problem is the second one from the camera.  Daniel Smith contractors are lined up to start work soon.

Even with strengthening, the bridge will have to be closed on occasions – perhaps up to 10 times per year. There may be weight restrictions in the future – at present, the bridge is just OK for Class 1.

The cost of annual maintenance and a programme of pier strengthening may cost something in the order of $2 million over the next 20 years – which may be all the life that is left in the bridge.

We all know that the bridge isn’t wide enough and that the southern approach has poor visibility.

So how much will a new bridge cost if it were to be built in the next two years or so?  A preliminary guesstimate for a standard-width bridge is $6 million to $10 million – with a bit more if a cycle and pedestrian lane (or lanes) is added – and that has to happen.  If the benefit/cost ratio meets NZ Transport Agency requirements, which is likely, that cost would be 59% subsidised by them.

Watch this space!  I emphasise that all of the above figures are ball-park estimates that were reported to the Council this week.


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